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Anti-Racism Resources for Teens, Kids and Parents

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Anti-Racism Resources for Teens, Kids and Parents

Parents
High Schoolers (grades 9-12)
  • 1619 Project by the New York Times' Nikole Hannah-Jones
  • An interactive website and podcast moving through the United States' history of slavery, white supremacy, and anti-black racism.
  • Stamped: Racism, Antiracism, and You by Jason Reynolds and Ibram X Kendi
  • An energizing narrative revealing the history of racism and a manifesto for an anti-racist future.
Middle Schoolers (grades 6-8)
  • Talking about Race web portal from the National Museum of African American History & Culture
  • a web portal full of learning opportunities for people of all ages. Look through this with your middle schooler!
Late Elementary Schoolers (grades 3-5)
Early Elementary (grades K-2)
  • Something Happened in Our Town by Marianne Celano, Marietta Collins, and Ann Hazzard, illustrated by Jennifer Zivoin ​
  • The story follows two families — one white, one Black — as they discuss a police shooting of a Black man in their community. The story aims to answer children’s questions about such traumatic events, and to help children identify and counter racial injustice in their own lives. Includes an extensive Note to Parents and Caregivers with guidelines for discussing race and racism with children, child-friendly definitions, and sample dialogues. 
  • Embrace Race's 31 Children's Books to Support Conversations on Race, Racism, and Resistance.
  • a list of 31 great books to support your family's learning through story
Toddlers
  • Antiracist Baby by Ibram X Kendi and Ashley Lukashevsky
  • a fresh new board book that empowers parents and children to uproot racism in our society and in ourselves.
  • Go through your child's books, dolls, and toys noticing how many people of color are represented as main characters in books and how diverse your toy selection is. If you discover that you're in need of some new books, check out this list.
  • Expose them to as much diversity as possible. If you live in a rather homogenous neighborhood and school, you can still eat diverse foods, watch programs with diverse casts, listen to a variety of languages, and expand your child's world.